Before it was cool to be green, we at Wild Frontier have been encouraging youth workers to teach, talk, and live a creation care worldview because this is an issue many youth are concerned about and it is a Christian responsibility.  Creation Care is more than a trend. This is more than a political issue.  It is obedience to one of the first commands God gave Adam.  Genesis 1:28 tells us "Be responsible for the fish in the sea and the birds in the air, and for every living thing that moves on the face of the Earth." (The Message) When you study all of the scriptures with this eye, you will see that the Church should have been the leaders in any and all of the environmental movements.  We as Christians have a responsibility to fulfill to our Earth.  We always have.  It's too late to take the lead on this but we certainly can get involved.

Bringing your church and youth ministry near and direct to Creation Care is a youth ministry issue.  Our teens are becoming more and more passionate about this.  So are the ever‑so‑slow‑adapting adults.  Typical of adolescence, teens become passionate about many things that don't transfer into their adult years.  However, we have hope that with a proper approach to Creation Care in youth ministry we can address that passion and teach lifelong habits about our responsibility to "every living thing that moves on the face of Earth."

WF Creation Care Stat


Before it was cool to be green, we at Wild Frontier have been encouraging youth workers to at least put a Creation Care stat on their websites or newsletters to help connect faith to this important issue with teens.

Patagonia, which makes high-end outdoor apparel, believes in the value of consuming less and reusing more. For Black Friday 2013, they showed a documentary in the stores called "Worn Wear," that tells the stories of customers who have re-used and repaired clothing instead of buying more. For that same Black Friday instead of big clothing sales, they sold a $29 sewing kit to be used to fix old clothes. That was not the first time Patagonia has encouraged customers to not purchase new clothes. They once ran a full-page ad in The New York Times that told readers, “Don’t buy this jacket” so that they could reduce their environmental footprint. (http://www.relevantmagazine.com/life/7-retail-companies-setting-right-example)

More Creation Care thinking…

G-Star Raw - Denim made from recycled plastic.  

WF Creation Care Stat


Before it was cool to be green, we at Wild Frontier have been encouraging youth workers to at least put a Creation Care stat on their websites or newsletters to help connect faith to this important issue with teens.

Bottled water isn’t just wasteful. It doesn’t really make sense. With the availability of filters for tap water (which is already held to high health standards; from the Mayo Clinic: “Tap water and bottled water are generally comparable in terms of safety”), purchasing individual, disposable bottles can be bad for your wallet and the environment. Every year, at least 17 million barrels of oil are used to produce the bottles—enough to keep gas in a million cars for an entire year. That doesn’t account for the amount of gasoline used to transport it. And, according to one study, 80 percent of the bottles never even get recycled. That means most of those clear plastic bottles end up in landfills, or worse, in the ocean. (Relevant Magazine.) 

For more Creation Care thinking…

Patagonia's Truth to Materials

"Truth to Materials honors the purest form of a material possible, be it minimally processed cashmere and wool, or going beyond organic by reusing cutting room scrap that might otherwise be discarded. It's about discovering the origin of a material and staying as true to that as possible during every step of design and manufacturing..."

WF Creation Care Stat


Before it was cool to be green, we at Wild Frontier have been encouraging youth workers to at least put a Creation Care stat on their websites or newsletters to help connect faith to this important issue with teens.

3 Plastics to Avoid

1.  Plastic No. 3 - Found in condiment bottles, teething rings, toys, shower curtains, window cleaner and detergent bottles, shampoo bottles, cooking oil bottles, clear food packaging, wire jacketing, medical equipment, siding, windows and piping, No. 3 plastics are at risk of releasing toxic breakdown products like phthalates into food and drinks.

2.  Plastic No. 6 - Or styrofoam.  The most difficult plastic to recycle.

3.  Plastic No. 7 - found in baby bottles, three- and five-gallon water bottles, 'bullet-proof' materials, sunglasses, DVDs, iPod and computer cases, signs and displays, certain food containers and nylon. Some of the resins in this plastic are toxic.  (TheDailyGreen.com, 2012)

For more Creation Care thinking...

An Agrarian View of the Bible